Thursday, September 24, 2020

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

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Issue 1

Sentenced to a Job Program "successful beyond expectations" and will be expanded

 

 

Prisoners have been sent to work "in real jobs, for real money" as part of the Sentenced to a Job Program, first reported in the Alice Springs News Online on December 18, 2012. Minister for Correctional Services John Elferink (pictured) says the trial program has been successful beyond expectations and will be expanded.

LETTER: R. M. Williams responds on Henbury

The owner and operator of Henbury Station, R. M. Williams Agricultural Holdings, clarifies points about Henbury Station raised by Nationals Deputy Senate Leader Senator Fiona Nash in her letter to the editor.

$23 million Bunnings development on schedule for mid-year

Bunnings Warehouse $23 million development will be completed mid-year, creating more than 100 permanent jobs and a further 160 construction jobs.

LETTER: Labor’s mismanagement of $9m splash on Henbury carbon farm

The Gillard Government doesn’t even have a management plan for a cattle property turned carbon farm, Henbury Station, south of Alice Springs,  it ploughed more than $9 million of taxpayer funds into back in 2011, writes Fiona Nash, Nationals Deputy Senate Leader.

Children at risk as department shuts down communications: insider

The Office of Children and Families has shut down vital communications with agencies and people representing children under protection orders.

The children are exposed to inadequate care because the system is no longer open to the independent scrutiny provided for by law.
And Minister for Children and Families, Robyn Lambley (pictured), is either unaware of the turmoil in her department, or is condoning it: either way she is failing in her portfolio, says an insider. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

Money for movies

The NT Government will maintain the previous level of funding for traveling film festivals such as the Sydney one, opening in Alice Springs for a three day season on Friday, with nine movies to be shown.

LETTER: Native title changes must go ahead, and should go further

Despite exaggerated claims from industry bodies and state governments, the Commonwealth’s proposed reforms to the Native Title Act 1993 are modest, straightforward, and long overdue. These changes leave many of the large problems in the native title system unchanged, but they address some of the small problems that can be easily fixed, writes Stephen Keim of the Australian Lawyers for Human Rights.

LETTER: All quiet on the Alice alcohol front

Alice Springs was a winner as well as the All Stars: a peaceful weekend thanks to co-operation and less grog. Take a bow Alice Springs.

You conducted yourself with dignity and discipline, writes Dr. John Boffa, of the People's Alcohol Action Coalition.

Tourism lobby to draw up action plan

 

 

 

 

A "who we are and what we do action plan" will be drafted by the executive of Tourism Central Australia with likely topics being a new website, increased use of social media, the continuation of the mountain biking strategy and moving the visitors centre, says TCA's new general manager Jaclyn Thorne (pictured). ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

LETTER: Native Title Act amendments should be withdrawn, says mining industry

Proposed amendments to the Native Title Act will increase uncertainty and inefficiency and lead to further delays in the native title negotiation process and in the release of mineral titles. The Amendment Bill should therefore be withdrawn immediately, writes Simon Bennison, of the Association of Mining and Exploration Companies.

LETTERS: Ministers reject Feds' intrusion into NT liquor policies

The request from Minister for Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, Jenny Macklin,  to appoint an assessor to review liquor premises is another example of Federal interference in the Territory, write Peter Chandler, NT Minister for Business. Meanwhile David Tollner, NT Minister for Alcohol Rehabilitation and Policy, writes the Federal government is acting on incorrect statistics from the former NT Labor government.

Any footy weekend troubles: don't look to native title body for help

As Alice Springs is dreading yet another tumultuous footy weekend, some may look to Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation (LAAC) to help keep in line marauding drunks and out of control youths trashing homes, cars and businesses, anti social behaviour perpetrated disproportionately by Aboriginal people.

The organisation's purpose is to manage the "rights and interests" of native title holders, as the Native Title Tribunal puts it. And LAAC has frequently claimed that its interests include upholding the image of the native title holders as people of high principles, concerned with maintaining an ancient culture and promoting respect for their traditional lands.

Reality check, please. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. PHOTO: Announcement of the Alice Springs native title claim decision by the Federal Court sitting in Alice Springs in 1999: The organisation it spawned has led to bitter division in the town's Aboriginal community.

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