Wednesday, September 23, 2020

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Home Issue 37

Issue 37

Central Desert Shire drops 11% of its Indigenous population

 

Central Desert Shire lost 6.6% of its population in the five years from 2006, according to the 2011 Census. And this was with a gain of 11.7% in its non-Indigenous population. Its Indigenous population fell by 11.1%. This was one of the standout snapshots from a presentation by the Australian Bureau of Statistics to the Alice Springs Town Council last night. KIERAN FINNANE reports. 

 

'Chain gang' or holiday gaol time: a crucial question for our parks

When the new government gets cracking on its promised work camps for prisoners it needs to look no further than the Larapinta Trail, much of which was built by inmate labour in the 1990s. The current dry spell and the escalating threat from weeds to our neglected national parks, add urgency for a cheap workforce that can be deployed at short notice. The need to halt the decay of our prime natural assets, which should be bringing home the bacon for our flagging tourism industry, makes a good argument for change for people now doing time in what some regard as holiday comfort. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. Pictured: Botanist Peter Latz with wattle burnt in a bushfire.

Officers a leap ahead of councillors on parks

The Town Council's Director of Technical Services, Greg Buxton, would appear to have been 'freelancing' (as Tony Abbott would put it) when he released earlier this month the 2004 draft report on council's parks. When the issue of public consultation was raised in last night's council meeting, Mayor Damien Ryan said it was Mr Buxton's decision to present the report, he didn't understand why he had done so and looked forward to finding out. Mr Buxton was not at the meeting to be asked. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

Alleged burglars sought by police

 

 

Police are asking for public assistance to identify two males who are responsible for several offences including the unlawful entry of an Alice Springs bar.

LETTER: Quota back in Alice

Quota International is looking to re-establish the once vibrant Quota Club in Alice Springs.

Aboriginal job training scheme in the bush: Governments, bureaucrats, contractors, public money – who gains what? A case study.

We are returning this story to the home page because we have received further government responses – as distinct from answers.

Leaving your home town to learn a trade is a tough call for anyone, even more so if you're an Aborigine living in a tight-knit remote community: while the bright lights may be alluring, the temptation of booze too often has catastrophic consequences.

Now a Cairns, Darwin and Adelaide based company has developed what may well be the answer: Don't take the people to the training, take the training to the people. By ERWIN CHLANDA. Photo: Construction industry trainees in the APY lands.

LETTER: Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association says live cattle exports on the right track

After last week’s industry and producer tour of inspection of live export supply chains in Sumatra and Java, David Warriner, president of the Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association, congratulated Indonesian industry, importers and Australian exporters on the implementation of the new Export Supply Chain Assurance Scheme (ESCAS) in Indonesia.

LETTER: A lot of hassle for a litre of oil – motor home tourist won't spend any more money here.

I would like to award Centralian Motors the thumbs down for wasting a day of my holidays.

Coniston: survivors & descendants recall massacre in new film

How could a man designated Protector of Aborigines end up leading a revenge party that would shoot at least 31 of them, including women and children, and probably many more, in retaliation for the death of one white man? It is a question that preoccupies a white Australian audience but the film Coniston does not try to answer it.  Nor does it look in much detail into the broad context of the infamous event it is concerned with – the last white on black massacre in Australia, starting at Coniston, about 250 kms north-west of Alice Springs, in 1928. The one hour documentary, that includes dramatised sequences, focusses instead on capturing the oral history of the massacre held by Warlpiri, Anmatyerr and Kaytetye people. KIERAN FINNANE reviews.

 

Country Liberals 'not ruling out' a floor price for alcohol

Key stakeholders in the Centre will meet about alcohol policy

 

UPDATE, September 18, 7.00pm: While they are "not ruling out" the introduction of a floor price on alcohol, the Country Liberals have "traditionally opposed it", said a spokesperson for Deputy Chief Minister Robyn Lambley ... read more in FULL STORY. 

 

Deputy Chief Minister Robyn Lambley would appear to be foreshadowing the introduction of a floor price for alcohol – whether Territory-wide or in Central Australia only is not clear. She has just issued a press release, calling on Police Minister Kon Vatskalis to say "whether Labor supports a floor price on the sale of take-away alcohol – a supply side measure Labor previously opposed when in Government". – Kieran Finnane

Bushfires an even bigger heartache when they are started by fools

The big country we live in turns into a monster when it burns, thumbing its nose at our feeble efforts to regain the upper hand.
It's the more agonising when the cause is human stupidity, carelessness or malice, as appears to have been the case a few days ago when part of the West MacDonnell National park, our greatest tourism asset, was turned into cinder.
An area of about 40 square kilometers was burned.
One blaze was started by the roadside near Redbank Gorge.
Another, ignited in dozens of spots for some 30 kilometers on the Glen Helen to Alice Springs road, was lit by sparks from a car driven on its rims. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

ABOVE: The Finke River (foreground) stopped the bushfire just short of a popular bush camp, and the Glen Helen Resort. Mount Sonder is in the background, charred bushland in the middle ground. LEFT: A curry wattle re-grows after a bushfire in the MacDonnell Ranges, near Ormiston.

Mills sidesteps Coroner's recommendation

UPDATE, September 18, 3.30pm:  Shadow Minister for Police Kon Vatskalis has called on the CLP Government to implement Coroner Greg Cavanagh's recommendation regarding reducing the supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets. However, he puts his own gloss on what that would mean: reinstating the Banned Drinker Register ... read more in FULL STORY.

 

Chief Minister Terry Mills has side-stepped Coroner Greg Cavanagh's recommendation that an urgent meeting of stakeholders be convened in Alice Springs to commit to "all available, reasonable measures to reduce the supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets". As reported yesterday, this was one of two recommendations to government made by the Coroner in handing down his findings from the inquest into the death in custody of Kwemetyaye Briscoe.

Mr Mills' response in a media release focussed on "the need for cultural change within the Northern Territory police force". On the issue of alcohol control, Mr Mills said only that the "Country Liberals will increase the focus on mandatory rehabilitation". KIERAN FINNANE reports.

 

- Advertisment -

Most Read

Desert Mob in the year of Covid

By KIERAN FINNANE How much the ‘mob’ matter at Desert Mob, the annual flagship exhibition from the region’s Aboriginal art centres, was made stark by...

A touch of light: return of the rainbow bee-eaters

By MIKE GILLAM All photos © Mike Gillam As temperatures rise plant production increases and with it, insect activity. Soon the vigorous fresh growing tips of...

From Central Australia to Central Districts

By JOHN P McD SMITH A book just published tells the amazing story of gifted Aboriginal footballer, Sonny Morey. He was born at Yambah Station north...