Thursday, June 17, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Tags Remote

Tag: remote

Making school success praiseworthy on remote Aboriginal communities

OpEd by RALPH FOLDS A kid learning quickly to read and write on a remote community is not considered smart, except perhaps by the school...

LETTER: Inauguration of ICTV Channel 601 at Yuendumu

At 5pm CST on April 18 2013, Indigenous Community Television (ICTV) will officially commence full-time broadcasts on its own dedicated channel (601 on VAST). The occasion marks over 30 years of broadcasting in remote Indigenous communities.
Yuendumu, 300 km NW of Alice Springs, is the home of Warlpiri Media (now PAW Media & Communications), who shares with Ernabella (home of EVTV), the historic foundation of Indigenous television in Australia, writes Rita Cattoni, Manager, Indigenous Community Television Limited.

Our children at the bottom of the barrel

 

 

 

UPDATED 8.10am November 7: The Minister comments

 

Some 200 Central Australian children bound up in the child welfare system are victims of policies that are arguably based on race politics and implemented often by inexperienced and overworked staff of the NT Department  of Children and Families (DFC), according to sources with long and intimate connections with the system. Robyn Lambley, the Minister for Families & Children Services of the new NT government, says: "Our aim is to identify and support kinship carers on communities to care for Aboriginal children rather than bringing kids into town and placing them routinely with non-Aboriginal families." ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

LETTER: Mills should chill on grog in bush communities

New Chief Minister Terry Mills should cease making comments about licensed social clubs in remote communities for the time being, writes Dr John Boffa of the People’s Alcohol Action Coalition (PAAC).

Aboriginal job training scheme in the bush: Governments, bureaucrats, contractors, public money – who gains what? A case study.

We are returning this story to the home page because we have received further government responses – as distinct from answers.

Leaving your home town to learn a trade is a tough call for anyone, even more so if you're an Aborigine living in a tight-knit remote community: while the bright lights may be alluring, the temptation of booze too often has catastrophic consequences.

Now a Cairns, Darwin and Adelaide based company has developed what may well be the answer: Don't take the people to the training, take the training to the people. By ERWIN CHLANDA. Photo: Construction industry trainees in the APY lands.

We need more than a new government

It's about the size of Central Europe. Less than 48,000 people live there, half of them in the major centre. Six governments look after it. They do not usefully coordinate their services. Yet each year, measured per-capita, they spend an obscene fortune. They rule from capitals thousands of kilometers away. The two main racial groups are at loggerheads. More than a third of the people are on welfare. Public service is the biggest employer. Of the 1800-odd businesses, 79% are micro or small, and of these, 83% rely on government spending and a transient population. There is no coherent plan for that country's future. What is its name? You guessed it – Central Australia.
But wait, there is hope and no better time than now to develop a vision for how this might be different.
Dr Bruce Walker (pictured) heads up Desert Knowledge Australia remoteFOCUS in Alice Springs which will release a major report on these issues next week. Here is a snapshot. PHOTO AT TOP: Aborigines were a key to the change of government. This is mobile polling station in the Karnte town camp in Alice Springs.

Alcohol by far enemy number one in crime fight

Booze remains by far the most damaging drug in the Central Australian outback: the top police officer in the bush says alcohol is doing 95% of the damage, with ganja (marijuana) the most popular illicit drug, and amphetamines playing a very minor role.
Police Superintendent Peter Gordon's beat is called Central Desert, with Alice Springs in the middle, around 600,000 square kilometers, twice the size of Germany.
He has 52 officers in 17 remote police stations. The trauma caused by alcohol is always on top of their agenda ... and the scams for getting grog to areas where it is banned display a destructive cunning. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. Photo: Backpacker's luggage being searched by police using a sniffer dog in the Adelaide bus terminal, a suspected place from where drugs are imported to the Northern Territory.

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