Monday, May 10, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Home Issue 39

Issue 39

LETTER: That great Larapinta Trail!

 

 

The 223km long Larapinta Trail was worth fighting for and the moment the week began we all knew we were on top of the world, writes Kim Burdett
, Student Experience Coordinator, Faculty of the Professions
, University of Adelaide.

LETTER: The book called Alice Springs ignores its most appealing features

The new book, entitled Alice Springs, does not include the very wonderful things that make Alice Springs so special, such as the stunning landscape, its multicultural population nor its many excellent amenities. The book focuses only on the situation of our Aboriginal people  without including anything about the people and the opportunities that are available, writes Janice Heaslip.

An open LETTER to young Paddy Gibson, Sydney academic and saviour of blackfellas.

Well once again you’ve sneaked into our country young Paddy to tell us all, black and white, what we should be doing about the most difficult and sensitive issues that we all face, writes Dave Price.

Why don't we do political satire in Alice?

 

 

 

 

 

 

My first reaction to The Little Prick was: why don't we do political satire in Alice Springs? It's a show of mock-up magazine covers, created in reaction to "lifestyle magazines" – ResideNT and the like (apparently there have been a number). It's funny and provocative, quite crass at times,  and what seems significant – in thinking about the difference between Darwin and Alice – is that it targets 'big ticket items'. These include our political leaders. KIERAN FINNANE reviews.

 

At left: Chayni Henry takes on a Territory Labor sacred cow with INPEX: We will all benefit. (The exhibition went on show in Darwin in July, before the Territory election.)

LETTER: All the things we don't do for tourism promotion

We should be selling experiences, not products, writes Trevor Shiell, and stop being outright mean to our visitors.

The answers to our grog problem will be a home brew, says Lambley

The new government's alcohol strategies will be a home-brewed solution, driven by locals and not by Darwin.

While Minister for Central Australia Robyn Lambley (pictured), after today's first "stakeholders" meeting on the issues, was surprisingly flexible about most issues, she's adamant that any solutions will come from locals. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

Price matters

The People's Alcohol Action Coalition (PAAC) presented this graph to today's meeting about alcohol in Alice Springs. It shows that as the wholesale price of alcohol increased (the solid red line)between July 2000 and December 2010, the volume of alcohol consumed per capita by individuals in Central Australia over 15 years of age decreased (the dotted red line). The vertical black lines are the points in time when various alcohol initiatives were introduced.

 

Source: The graph is from a longitudinal study of the influences on alcohol by the National Drug Research Institute (Curtin University), June 2012.

Alcohol meeting in chaos and under heavy guard

The new government's grappling with alcohol problems is off to a chaotic start.
Deputy Chief Minister Robyn Lambley called a meeting of "stakeholders" – excluding the media and the public. But uninvited guests – family and friends of Kwementyaye Briscoe who died in the Alice Springs watchhouse in January – turned the gathering into noisy chaos, with his aunt, Patricia Morton Thomas (pictured), noisily demanding that police be charged.

 

Public housing rents in remote areas

 

 

A recent Australian Bureau of Statistics presentation to the Alice Springs Town Council recently showed that the median weekly rent in MacDonnell Shire is $25, and in Central Desert Shire, $20. The Alice Springs News Online asked Territory Housing to confirm this, and asked about the maximum and minimum rents for public housing in the shires. Andrew Kirkman, Executive Director for Remote Housing NT explains.

Public, new investigators to target arsonists

 

 

 

A burnt match, a footprint, a tyre tread will be the kind of forensic items arson investigators will be looking for, says Dave Letheby District Fire Officer Southern Region. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

PHOTO at right: Hazard abatement burning shown to Alice Springs media this week.

Public in the dark about significant facts in the grog debate

At tomorrow's meeting of stakeholders about alcohol issues in Alice Springs, we can expect that all the facts will be on the table. But the public will be in the dark about at least one of them: the number of protective custodies this year compared to last. That will become public knowledge later this month, when the NT Police Annual Report is tabled, but until then NT Police are declining to release the figures. The Alice Springs News Online has asked for them following a reader's post which suggested that they had halved this winter compared to last, evidence that the Banned Drinkers Register (rolled out from July last year and with 2491 people registered as at June 30, 2012) was taking effect. However, we have been fobbed off. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

LETTER: Frontline care for kids being cut

Critical service delivery for frontline care and protection of Territory children is being cut by the CLP Government, says Kay Densley of the Community and Public Sector Union.

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