Saturday, May 15, 2021

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Tags Raft artspace

Tag: raft artspace

Breathe in the Brio’s exceptional air

By KIERAN FINNANE An explosive sense of “who we are” radiates from the recent work by the Tennant Creek Brio, showing at Raft Artspace. It...

Stance of the patriarchs and matriarchs

 

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Munu Mike Williams's works of protest against uranium mining and all that flows from it are part of a powerful new exhibition at RAFT. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

Invitation to a dance

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The latest foray by Ngurratjtua artists is "still landscape painting”, but in being printed on circular skirts it is alluringly transformed, as sculpture and wearable art, writes Kieran Finnane.

 

'What holds you, the beauty or the damage?'

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A show at Raft Artspace takes us on a depth journey into landscape painting in the hands of a fine artist, Jennifer Taylor. Her enquiry over three years, conducted in Eastern Arrernte country around the present-day Ross River Resort, led her to think about the possibility of painting landscapes as portraits. Could a landscape painting be “as searching and intimate, as full of life and empathy as a good portrait”? KIERAN FINNANE  reports.

‘Sculpture can be personal’

 

Sculptor Sia Cox’s exhibition Good Friends, recently shown at RAFT Artspace, was a wondrous survey of contemporary portraiture. A room of soft sculptures, in the form of puppets, figures and still life, celebrated the artist’s dearly held relationships with both family and friends. It was impossible not to be drawn into the multitude of emotions expressed both plainly and subtly by this eclectic gathering of characters and in a peculiar, yet intimate way to, at least for a moment, become a part of their world. LUKE SCHOLES reviews.

Never ending story: Desert Mob 2013

 

 

 

 

 

From Aboriginal art centres across the deserts comes one of the most significant interfaces between Central Australia and the rest of the world. KIERAN FINNANE reports from Desert Mob, the exhibition and the symposium.

 

Pictured: Warmurrungu by Nyarapayi Giles, Tjarlirli Arts.

The product of time spent joyfully

 

 

 

 

 

At over eighty years of age, Lilly Ulah’s display of glowing canvases at Raft Artspace confronts the tendency to couple physical frailty with colourlessness. Faded, dull, paling, lackluster or dim are words that connote age; while vivid, bright and shining mark the spiritedness of youth. When the Coober Pedy Arts Project began their workshops in 2010, no one could have predicted that the most brilliant participant to emerge would be a resident of Umoona Aged Care; a woman without any technical arts training. ANNA GEORGIA MACKAY went to the opening.

 

Town camp artists do it their way

They are a group of people about whom much is said and written by others, but here is chance to see residents of the Alice Springs town camps express themselves in their own images and words. They tell us about daily life, spirit life, memory, reflection, aspiration. There is humour, affection, yearning, delight, pride. Two Alice Springs art centres, Tangentyere Artists and Yarrenyty Arltere Artists, have combined to present this exhibition, Our Way, Their Way, at RAFT Artspace. KIERAN FINNANE reviews.

Pictured: No Trouble Here? by Sally Mulda.

Painting the deep patterns of life

With time inevitably short, three old men from Wanarn, way out in the Gibson Desert, speak to us on canvas with a sense of urgency. They give us the essence and they move on. The fundamental design elements of Aboriginal art from the desert  – the familiar dotted lines, roundels, concentric circles, interlocking grids – are deployed without "embellishment", as Dallas Gold of RAFT Artspace says.

Their names are Ben Holland, Tjunka Lewis and Neville Mcarthur. They live in an aged care facility at Warnan, pictured at left on painting day in a photo by Peter Yates, Tjunka Lewis in the foreground. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

Three day trek on foot to reach art centre: revise your definition of 'remote'!

We're used to the word 'remote' in Central Australia but try this for size: to reach the string of five art centres that make up Omie Artists you must trek by foot for up to three days, often (for seven months of the year and then some) in torrential rain, across flooding rivers, clambering up muddy mountain sides and slithering down again. The company's valiant manager, Brennan King, with six Omie security guards, necessary to protect him from attack by 'rascals' from the neighbouring tribe, make this journey several times a year. The artists' work – among the last traditional barkcloths being produced in the world – has to be brought out the same way, rolled over PVC pipes and hoisted on the shoulders of the art centre coordinators.

How remarkable then for these works, steeped in the law and lore of the Omie tribe of Papua New Guinea and many of them a tour de force of design brilliance, to arrive on our doorstep here in the dry centre of Australia and to resonate so strongly with us.

This experience we owe to, apart from Omie Artists, RAFT Artspace in Alice Springs. Its curator Dallas Gold wants to take the pulse of contemporary art in our region (in its expanded definition) and give us a sense of its dynamism, diversity, achievement and promise. This is the third exciting show in a row at RAFT, each stop opening up a window onto a world rich with beauty, ideas, observation and spirit.

The Omie are few in number, King says about 1800 according to a census done by the Omie themselves in 2009.  Around 70 artists are producing barkcloths. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

 


 Pictured, above left:  Omie dance a welcome celebration for Brennan King's arrival at their newest art centre in January 2010. • Above: Pig tusks and teeth, and fern leaves by Linda-Grace Savari. Photos courtesy Omie Artists.

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