Sunday, June 13, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Home Issue 8

Issue 8

The long and the short of an accountable council

In a new move towards accountability, councillors at last night's meeting were asked to provide a verbal report of their activities over the last month. This may be voluntary but it wasn't a good look for Cr Geoff Booth, attending the meeting by phone, to have taken no notes of his activities and to make no report. Cr Chansey Paech also declined the opportunity. Cr Eli Melky provided a list as long as your arm ... KIERAN FINNANE reports.

 

Pictured: Cr Booth could have said, as others did, that he attended the recent Waste Management Facility media event. There he is, second from the right. From left, Deputy Mayor Liz Martin, Mayor Damien Ryan, NT Minister Alison Anderson, MHR Warren Snowdon, Cr Brendan Heenan, and at far right, Cr Steve Brown.

 

Marching to the top of the hill and down again

 

 

 

 

Two news items today are reminiscent of two much earlier events, equally related to each other.

The first is that a new speed limit of 70 km/h will commence today (April 29, 2013) from the Tom Brown Roundabout south through Heavitree Gap to just beyond the turnoff to the Commonage Road on the south Stuart Highway. The second story concerns the NT Government’s protestations against the federal Labor government’s apparent threat to withdraw or hold up funding for the NT unless the Banned Drinkers’ Register is re-instated. COMMENT by ALEX NELSON.

Why don't police come clean on drunks taken to hospital?

 

The slamming – his word – by Chief Minister Adam Giles of Prime Minister Julia Gillard for her "loosely veiled threat to cut funding to the Territory if the Government doesn’t reinstate the failed Banned Drinkers Register" would have a great deal more credibility if the NT police, for which he has responsibility, provided information that would make the BDR debate much better informed. COMMENT by ERWIN CHLANDA. PICTURED: The leaked document. It seems to show a 50%, not nearly a 100%, increase in hospital admissions.

LETTER: Zero confidence follows cattle trade suspension, Gillard told

In a meeting with the Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association (NTCA) today, Australia’s Prime Minister Julia Gillard received a frank and detailed brief on the state of the northern cattle industry, a stark picture of an industry fighting combined forces of record low prices and volume into the Indonesian market, record low prices on the domestic market and a high Australian dollar, writes Luke Bowen, Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association Executive Director.

Magistrate fails Transport Hall of Fame: Liz Martin

The failure of a magistrate to order restitution following a burglary at the Road Transport Hall of Fame will spark a protest by her and supporters outside the Alice Springs courthouse, says the hall's CEO, Liz Martin.

She is also a town councillor.

The heist netted three burglars more than $23,000 in cash. Of that $8500 was given to a man who later spent it on a car.
The man, Michael Foster, appeared before Magistrate David Bamber on April 15 charged with receiving the amount  and with several other offences. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. Photo: Damage caused by the alleged burglars.

LETTER: Mandatory rehabilitation bill must be released for public consultation

The NT Government to release its mandatory rehabilitation legislation for public consultation prior to the next Parliamentary sittings in mid-May, writes Priscilla Collins, CEO of the Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT.

Alice locals join Citizens for Action

The empty seats don't tell the story: the handful of people who attended the Alice Springs launch of NT Citizens for Action (NTCA) have their town at heart, and show it in a variety of ways. NTCA was spawned in Darwin at a meeting of four people December 22 but now has a Facebook site with nearly 1400 members: is public engagement morphing from often drawn out meetings, attended mostly by the usual suspects, into a viral online phenomenon? ERWIN CHLANDA reports. PHOTO: Krissi Besic from Darwin and Phil Walcott addressing the new group.

No risk from uranium, thorium at mine near Alice: chairman

 

 

Radioactive uranium and thorium to be stored near the proposed Nolans Bore rare earth mine (pictured), 135 kms north of Alice Springs, will present no danger to the public, says Arafura Resources chairman, Ian Kowalick. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. PHOTO: The site of the proposed mine.

Water find may aid rare earth processing north of Alice

 

 

Arafura Resources is looking at relocating more of its processing for the Nolans Bore Rare Earths Project close to the mine site (pictured) near Aileron, 135 km north of Alice Springs. (Photo courtesy Arafura Resources.)

LETTER: Too much or not enough debt?

Are conservative politicians right when they blame economic woes on too much debt, asks Richard Bentley of Alice Springs.

Opposite poles: candidates for Lingiari

While pollies across the nation mostly look, talk and walk like one another, the candidates for the two major parties in Lingiari couldn't be more different. ERWIN CHLANDA spoke with the Country Liberals' Tina MacFarlane at drinks and nibbles when she (at left in the photo) received encouragement from Nationals Leader Warren Truss (at the microphone). So synonymous is the sitting Member with the sprawling seat after 25 years in Canberra, that branch president Daniel Davis (next to Mr Truss) wound up the evening by saying: "I'd like to thank Warren Snowdon very much for being here tonight." It brought the house down.

(Jenny Lillis is at the far right of the photo.)

Tourism Central Australia gears up to tackle slump

DISPUTE OVER ROCK TOUR GUIDES MAY HARM INDUSTRY

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A dispute over tour guiding at Ayers Rock may develop into a brawl impacting on the tourism industry nation-wide.

Federal Parks Australia, which runs the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, requires tour guides to be accredited: they have to show a badge at the gate proving that they are.
Some international companies bring their own guides who have obtained accreditation – it only takes a two day course to get it.
However, this requirement of the parks service has put the spotlight on the fact that while the overseas guides may be complying with park regulations, they may be in breach of immigration requirements, because they may not have work visas for Australia. Jaclyn Thorne (pictured), General Manager of Tourism Central Australia (TCA), says the issues were raised at a meeting at Yulara this week. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

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