Friday, May 7, 2021

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Issue 4

Lhere Artepe aims to strengthen relationship with Alice Springs community

Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation needs to be placed "back in the hands of the Arrernte people as the native title holders of Central Australia," says Ian McAdam (see report below).
His appointment as the chairman of town's native title organisation was confirmed today.
He says the group, which is emerging from years of internal strife, "will play a bigger role in our community.

"We will focus on regaining the trust of forgotten native title holders and work hard to strengthen the relationship with the Alice Springs community as a whole.

"
The directors, drawn from the three estate groups, are:-

Antulye: Mr McAdam (chairperson); Willy Satour, Felicity Hayes and Janice Harris.

Irlpme: Noel Kruger (deputy chairperson); Kathy Martin, Bonita Kopp and Raymond Peters.

Mparntwe: Michael Liddle (deputy chairperson); Tessa Campbell, Carolyn Liddle and Ian Conway.

Leadership spill in Lhere Artepe

Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation has a new chairman, Ian McAdam (pictured left), who is replacing Brian Stirling (pictured right), according to an executive member of the group.

Noel Kruger remains as one vice-chairman and Michael Liddle has been appointed as the second.
Eight of the 12 executive members have survived the shake-up, while four new ones have been appointed, including Ian Conway, one of the leading reformers of the town's native title group.
The changes follow years of turmoil within the group, and recently the sacking of CEO Darryl Pearce, to whom Mr Stirling was close.
The source says more decisions will be made on Monday.
The changes have been approved by the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations, according to the source.
Mr McAdam works for the education department and is the assistant director, Alice Springs Football Academy - The Clontarf Foundation. He is also a participant in the Desert Knowledge leadership program (its website is the source of Mr McAdam's photo). ERWIN CHLANDA reports. SEE BELOW for more Lhere Artepe reports.

Housing crisis as 860 dwellings are in development

There is land for 860 dwellings in various stages of development in Alice Springs, yet if you wanted to buy a residential block you'd be pushed to find one. And this is counting only 150 dwellings in Kilgariff which will ultimately provide 4500.

Nothing illustrates more how dysfunctional the town's land development "system" is, a key reason for the current exodus of productive, middle-class families.
The biggest major projects – Coolibah Estate, Emily Valley and White Gums – are foundering or are being delayed while at the other end of the spectrum are projects that would make a mining camp appear a leafy suburb (see drawing).

What is a housing block worth? There are so few available that it's difficult to tell.
The hard numbers are for blocks in Stirling Heights, says veteran real estate man Doug Fraser, which went for an average $120,000 in 2006, and Albrecht Drive for an average of $150,000 in 2009.

He says most of the world's towns and cities grow from their fringes: Alice did with Larapinta, Morris Soak, Dixon Road, New Eastside, Sadadeen.
Native title put a stop to this process although the government – as the Opposition tirelessly pointed out – had options of putting the public good ahead of the demands of a minority.
Instead of taking advantage of the vast amount of space around the town, developers had to buy up "infill" such as old caravan parks, at a massive cost, and the residential land crisis was born. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

Lhere Artepe company says Mt Johns subdivision back on track, significant changes for supermarkets

The issue of land titles for the Mt Johns Valley residential subdivision (pictured) is now imminent and over the next two months there will be "significant changes to the financial management and overall operations" of the Eastside, Flynn Drive and Hearne Place supermarkets, according to Sally McMartin, business manager of Lhere Artepe Enterprises (LAE).
She says the company linked to Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation has been reviewing its operations with a "strong focus on effective management" and ensuring that "finances are managed effectively."
LAE sacked its CEO Darryl Pearce last month.

Can the town afford the welfare burden?

 

Kay Eade, Executive Officer of the Chamber of Commerce in Alice Springs, joins our Food for Thought panel this week.

When things get tough the tough get going. Kay strutted a no-nonsense attitude at a string of recent public functions: Enough talk. Here are her views of what action the town needs.

When Alice Springs was going through difficult times during the summer of 2011, I contacted many regional Chambers to find out if their communities were experiencing similar issues, and if so, what were they doing to combat the problem.

Most of them were, or had been, having difficulties with lawlessness which added to businesses operating expenses.

One topic which kept being raised was that of welfare payments.  Many of the Chambers I contacted stated that their community believed that welfare was hindering the progress of their regions.

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