Monday, September 28, 2020

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Tags Funding

Tag: funding

Gap pedestrian crossing goes, Feds waive refund

 

 

UPDATE Wednesday, January 22, 1:45pm

An agreement has been stuck with the Black Spot Program for there to be no requirement for the NT Government to pay back the cost of installing the crossing, and that it will fund the additional safety measures for this area.

 

Yesterday's report: The Commonwealth Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development will not be paying for the removal of the controversial pedestrian crossing at The Gap. What's more, if the Territory Department of Transport removes the crossing, it will have to return the Federal Government $266,521 in Black Spot funding. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. PHOTO: Work starts on removal of crossing.

Questionmark over funding for Desert Knowledge

Desert Knowledge Australia (DKA) is in "in discussion" with the NT Government about its funding. Both the chairman, Fred Chaney, a former Coalition Federal Indigenous Affairs Minister, and CEO John Huigen are confirming this. Pictured: The Desert Knowledge precinct in Alice Springs. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

 

UPDATE Dec 5:

 

Mr Huigen announced today that the NT Government is undertaking its first review of DKA since it began operating under the Desert Knowledge Australia Act in 2003, saying: “This is a timely opportunity to actively demonstrate our practical achievements since we began 10 years ago as part of the Alice in 10 project."

Snowdon's new career as Groucho Marx impersonator?

 

 

 

Slags off at all local media except the ABC which gets funding increase.

Congress: Not asking for more, but don't give us less

The wish list of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, for whomever will gain power in Canberra, contains not what it wants to get, but what it doesn't want taken away. In a swirl of rumored spending cuts, where will the money come from to drive the newly chosen direction? The 40-year-old NGO that has a budget of $38m a year, for both town and "auspiced" services. More than 70% comes from the Feds. Congress has 300 employees, half of them Aboriginal. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

IMAGE from the Congress annual report 2010-11, as published on the web.

Budget: Public service to work harder, debt not for daily costs

The NT Budget next week won't cut many more jobs from the public service, but public servants will need to work harder, running unfunded projects left behind by the Labor government, and bringing to reality new ones promised by the CLP.

Borrowed money isn't a bad thing so long it's not used for the day to day administration, but rather for assets cranking up employment and the economy.

Some of the flood of Canberra money will continue to be used to subsidise the ailing Power Water Corporation (PWC), but the corporation will be required to massively improve its efficiency. But we will continue to have some of the nation's lowest electricity tariffs.

So says NT Treasurer Dave Tollner, partly in response to a comment published here on Monday. He spoke to Alice Springs News Online editor ERWIN CHLANDA. PHOTO: Mr Tollner talking to anti-uranium protesters during the Legislative Assembly sittings in Alice Springs in November, 2009.

Bush funding: what does the one hand know about the other?

The Remote Jobs and Communities Program was announced by the Federal Minister for Indigenous Employment and Economic Development, Julie Collins (pictured left) in Alice Springs. It makes no mention of the initiative by her Northern Territory counterpart, Alison Anderson (pictured right), aiming to subject regional development to "integration and coordination across business, industry, the community and all levels of government". Both initiatives were announced yesterday and have roughly the same objectives in the same region and are trying to help the same people: But it appears that when it comes to spending public money, one hand, once again, cares little about what the other is doing. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

LETTER: Bid for Outback Highway money

The Outback Highway Development Council Inc. completed its $14.9m funding application for Round 4 Regional Development Australia - Regional Development Infrastructure Fund, to upgrade and seal priority sections of the Outback Way, 2800km between Laverton WA and Winton in Qld, linking Perth to Qld as a trans-national link, writes Patrick Hill, chairman, of the Outback Highway Development Council.

NT Minister to probe Tangentyere funding for town camps

Tangentyere Council needs to come clean with the taxpayer about how it spends the $43m a year it gets from the public purse, says NT Minister for Indigenous Advancement, Alison Anderson (at left). She says the arganisation was previously responsible for all or most of the town's up to 19 camps, but is is now looking after fewer than half of them; is failing to stem the "rivers of grog" despite the camps' "dry" status, is incapable of curbing extreme violence; and is treated by the Shaw family as its private "dynasty". ERWIN CHLANDA reports. PHOTOS: Garbage in Charles Creek in 2010. The same location on Wednesday this week, after Ingkerreke has taken over from Tangentyere clean-up and parks maintenance functions.

Protecting, controlling kids in trouble: Robyn Lambley's long and lonely road

 

 

A youth curfew during periods of period of "high social unrest," grappling with how to make parents pay for the damage done by their kids, an institution for young people out of control or with special needs, the government paying up to half a million dollars a year for some children in residential care services, massive cuts in Federal funding for child welfare and protection – these are some of the waypoints on the long and lonely road of the Minister for Children and Families, Robyn Lambley (pictured with constituents, photo supplied by her office). She spoke with editor ERWIN CHLANDA.

Urgent talks with NT government as organisation cannot pay its bills

By ERWIN CHLANDA

 

Hiccups in NT Government funding for ASYASS, an Alice Springs NGO providing emergency accommodation for young people, were given "urgent priority" in talks yesterday as the organisation was unable to pay some of its bills.

ASYASS director Brian Hayes said yesterday the problems had existed for five to six months but he was confident they would be fixed.

The News was unable to contact him today.

A spokesman for the government said: "Issues relating to payment of invoices were identified last week and are being resolved by the Regional Executive Director, Central Australia as an urgent priority."

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