Saturday, May 15, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Tags Closing the Gap

Tag: Closing the Gap

Focus on treaty as conditions in the bush remain appalling

PART THREE by ROGER STEELE and DON FULLER Waste and incompetence are rampant. In Part Two we gave as an example Roebourne in Western...

Aboriginal participation needed to Close the Gap: Mundine

 

 

“Those just looking at jail statistics should be targeting a reduction of crime – not a reduction of incarceration,” says Warren Mundine (pictured), contributing researcher at the Centre for Independent Studies.

Ted Egan: Forget splitting hairs, counting drops of blood.

2640 Ted Egan 2 SM2640 Jones book woman SMAny person who can establish genetic link to Australia in 1787 may be acknowledged, honoured and respected, by official recognition as a First Australian. I make some hopefully positive suggestions on semantic issues, as the nation looks for positive ways to “close the gap”. It is a chasm. We certainly need to be thinking big, to allow meaningful interpretation of our history, going back centuries in reflection. By TED EGAN (at left). Young Arrernte woman at Alice Springs Telegraph Station, ca. 1895.

The evasive closing gap: Focus must be on kids, says Morrison

2532 Scott Morrison SM

 

 

More than half of the targets were not met – yet they had been set by the bureaucracy, top to bottom, says the Prime Minister (pictured). ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

Closing the Gap: Lofty words, inadequate deeds

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While the nation is awash in rhetoric about Indigenous advancement, especially in housing, in the real world of Alice Springs town camps residents are confronted by inadequate and expensive bureaucracies. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

 

Cuts give Indigenous advancement "uncertain future"

Local government in the bush is grappling with Federal funding cuts, write President Adrian Dixon and CEO Cathryn Hutton, of the Central Desert Regional Council.
 

Competitive tendering wasting 'closing the gap' money

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There is progress in health but education outcomes are poor, writes Donna Ah Chee, Congress CEO (pictured).

 

The need for coordinating our multitude of NGOs

A meeting of some 60 non-government organisations (NGOs) yesterday heard about successful ways for services to cooperate, but also laid bare absurd failures of the current system. Congress CEO Donna Ah Chee (pictured) was there and spoke to the Alice Springs News Online about it. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

Closing the Gap working, needs long term commitment

 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

We welcome the latest Closing the Gap report card, saying the NT is the only jurisdiction currently on track to close the gap by 2031. This achievement is in large part the result of governments working in genuine partnership with Aboriginal community-controlled health services and investing new funds where they are most needed, writes Donna Ah Chee, CEO of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress.

 

Council gets the drum on community harmony, Port Augusta style

While he was "really impressed" with the many "community harmony" initiatives taken in Port Augusta, and with their apparent success reflected in the town's general appearance and atmosphere, the consultant reporting back to the Alice Springs Town Council was at pains to point out the "very significant" differences between the two towns.

Alice has twice the population, said Craig Wilson of Craig Wilson Consultancy, formerly an employee of the Alice council, now based in Mt Gambier.

Port Augusta has only one Aboriginal community on its periphery, Davenport, in contrast to Alice's 18 town camps.

Davenport, which is not a dry zone, has a population of around 200, compared with the 2000 to 3000 living in Alice's camps.

Around 1300 people from outlying areas use Port Augusta as their regional hub, as opposed to the 11,000 to 12,000 for whom Alice is the regional centre, said Mr Wilson.

Key among the initiatives have been the Port Augusta Aboriginal Community Engagement Group and the City Safe Program. The engagement group's enquiries into budgets and outcomes of various government departments and agencies were initially seen as "threatening" but are now well accepted. City Safe is in the hands of a private contractor whose personal qualities seem to account for a good deal of his success. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

PICTURE: Port Augusta's ACEG in session. From left – Khatija Thomas Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement,  Aaron Stuart, Katy Burns, Alwyn McKenzie and Corey McKenzie.

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