Friday, May 14, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Tags Outstations

Tag: outstations

Outstations 'near Alice' excluded from the biosecurity areas

Residents will be treated "just like other rural residents" on the edge of town, says the Central Land Council.

The Territory's $30m homelands conundrum

If you believe there's nothing out there in our wide open spaces beyond the handful of major centres – think again. There are 772 other locations where people live, funded through NGOs, local government or the government direct. Regional Development Minister Alison Anderson is now lifting this $30m a year conundrum out of the too hard basket. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. Photo: Google Earth image of an outstation near Utopia, just off the Sandover Highway, north-east of Alice Springs.

Advancement in the bush: no more 'one size fits all', says Minister

Alison Anderson has proved her political clout in her electorate, increasing her vote despite her switch of party and the negative campaign against her. Now she is setting out to prove it as a Minister in two important portfolios – Indigenous Advancement and Regional Development. She has showed her style early, suggesting that Federal Indigenous Affairs Minister Jenny Macklin is in "La La Land" if she thinks she's "closing the gap", but what will be the substance? The long-awaited report by NT Coordinator-General of Remote Services, Olga Havnen, has finally been released. Ms Anderson is not committing her government to implementing its recommendations as formulated because, although it has attracted a lot of publicity, she says the report is "nothing new". She is also not sure if she will maintain the position of Coordinator-General, which she created as Labor Minister, and her comments suggest she is moving away from the Working Future policy and its associated Growth Towns, again her creations while she was with the Labor Government. KIERAN FINNANE speaks with Ms Anderson in the wake of the Havnen Report.

 

Pictured: Ms Anderson with Judy Brumby (right) and Esmeralda, both from Areyonga, during her election campaign.

 

Keep your nose out of our business, candidate tells Amnesty International

Country Liberal candidate for Stuart Bess Price has fired a broadside at two local representatives of Amnesty International for sticking their noses into Aboriginal business and has threatened to make a formal complaint.

Amnesty also put its foot in it when Secretary General Salil Shetty visited the Utopia region in October last year.
Ms Price's angry reaction follows a series of questions from James Milsom and Rachel Toovey, members of the Alice Springs Action Group of Amnesty International, to explore Ms Price's stance on several issues, mostly about outstations in Central Australia.

"I have some urgent questions for you that I expect to be answered in full by August 9 (tomorrow)," Ms Price emailed them, "so that I can tell my people and all of the people of the Stuart electorate of all ethnicities what your agenda is and why they should speak up for themselves." Photo: Bess Price (standing) on the campaign trail.

Funding announcements flow for 'Stronger Futures' in Aboriginal communities

The spectre of outstations and homelands in the Northern Territory forsaken by governments has receded, at least for another decade.

A $221 million "investment" to provide them with basic essential and municipal services over 10 years was announced this week by Indigenous Affairs Minister Jenny Macklin, joined by Lingiari MHR Warren Snowdon and NT Senator Trish Crossin.

Although the total funding sounds large, in reality it is basically more of the same, as the Australian Government has been providing the NT Government with $20 million each year since 2007 for this purpose.

They are boosting their contribution over the decade by $6m and the NT Government is kicking in $15m.

In another announcement, $619 million was allocated to remote policing, community night patrols and legal assistance services.

This will enable the NT Government to continue employing 60 full-time NT police officers in 18 remote communities, and build an additional four permanent remote area police complexes in communities.

The figures climbed today, with new announcements in Alice Springs. There will be $719 million over 10 years for better primary health care and improved access to dental and allied health services, and another $443 million over 10 years for playgroups, home and parenting support services, youth workers and safe houses. – Kieran Finnane

'Hunted like dogs' by Intervention

Last night's Q&A on the ABC was hugely useful for understanding
the popular national debate about Aboriginal issues: Its perverse
uselessness, to be precise.

Rosalie Kunoth-Monks (pictured) commented on the
Federal Intervention, costing millions of dollars, in the wake of the
chilling "Children are Sacred" report into abuse and neglect. She
recalls that army, police and bureaucrats arrived in her home town of
Utopia and proceeded to "hunt us like dogs".

Moderator Tony Jones did not ask for an explanation nor elaboration.

It was a notable addition to Mrs Kunoth-Monks vocabulary: Last week she accused Australia of "ethnic cleansing".

Was the Darwin audience outraged? No way. It applauded. Profusely. Photo: Mrs Kunoth-Monks makes a point during the show, flanked by NT Chief Minister Paul Henderson (left) and moderator Tony Jones. COMMENT by ERWIN CHLANDA.

Amnesty rhetoric fails to show the way forward for homelands

The one-day visit last Saturday by Secretary General of Amnesty International, Salil Shetty, to the Utopia homelands generated the usual round of headlines: conditions are "devastating", comparable to those in the "Third World", policies amount to "ethnic cleansing" (this last from Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, Utopia resident and Barkly Shire President).
What the so-called "fact finding mission" did not do was shed any light on the challenges facing governments and Aboriginal people about the future of the homelands at Utopia and elsewhere. This was done incisively by the outgoing Northern Territory Coordinator General for Remote Services, Bob Beadman (at right), in May of this year. His few pages of analysis provide far more insight into the situation than all of Amnesty's rhetoric, either in Mr Shetty's pronouncements or Amnesty's report, The Land Holds Us, released in August.
Mr Beadman also recommends some immediate (catch-up) steps for governments to take. There's no sign of the Northern Territory Government doing so. Minister for Indigenous Development Malarndirri McCarthy declined to answer the questions put to her by the Alice Springs News. Amnesty also declined to be interviewed by the Alice
Springs News.

However, a spokesperson for Federal Indigenous Affairs Minister Jenny Macklin says her government "respects the rights of Indigenous Australians to live on their traditional lands and acknowledges the profound connection which many Aboriginal people have with their homelands" but "housing investment is currently focussed on larger Indigenous communities where more Indigenous people live and which are faced with poor housing and overcrowding".

And the spokesperson says Canberra has provided to the NT Government $80 million for provision of basic municipal and essential services to homelands in the Northern Territory over the past four years but "future funding from July next year will be discussed with the
Northern Territory Government." KIERAN FINNANE reports.

PHOTO ABOVE: Lenny Jones, 73, and Albert Bailey, 79, Chairperson of  Urapuntja Health both from Soapy Bore, speak with Amnesty International Secretary General Salil Shetty. Photo courtesy Amnesty International.

Amnesty's Utopia report full of omissions and misrepresentations

 

 

 

The human rights organisation Amnesty International has released what
it calls a research report, focussed on the changes in government
policy, particularly since the Intervention, that have affected the
Utopia homelands in the Northern Territory.

The report argues that through leasing and inadequate
funding governments are actually taking land away its traditional
owners.

Nowhere in the report is there an acknowledgement that leasing only
applies to a tiny fraction of Aboriginal lands, that is the land on
which government is building and maintaining infrastructure.
A "group of Aboriginal elders" is quoted as saying in part:
"Through harsh changes we have had removed from us all control over our
communities and our lives. Our lands have been compulsorily taken from
us. We have been left with nothing." There is no explanation nor
qualification of this dramatic claim.

The only named contributor to the report is senior Aboriginal woman
and activist Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, of Jedda acting fame, who provides
the Foreword for the paper which lambasts the new shire system without
mentioning that she is the president of her shire.

And the report advances mixed evidence of the benefit of living on
homelands, including that they are a "central" component of the Northern
Territory's $775.78m tourism industry, with no scrutiny of the
realities, including welfare dependency. KIERAN FINNANE reports. Photo at top: Jeffrey
Pepperill Kemarr and family at Camel Camp on the Utopia homelands,
about 30 kms from Arlparra. Source: Amnesty International, Lucas Jordan.
Above: Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, with daughter Ngarla and granddaughter Ruby, in 2006. From the Alice News archive.

 

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