Tuesday, May 18, 2021

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Tags Desart

Tag: desart

Art centres: pushing back, pushing forward

 

With most Aboriginal art centres in the region in various stages of coronavirus shutdown, the focus of their advocacy body, Desart, is on preparing for recovery. Research showing the centres' slow but steady recovery since the GFC makes CEO Philip Watkins quietly confident. KIERAN FINNANE reports. 

Desert Mob’s dazzling reminder of gallery potential

p2561 Desert Mob Kulitja SM
 
Works containing “a great deal of cultural power” created by “black-skinned proud Aboriginal people” have once again made their journey across the surrounding desert lands to the Araluen Arts Centre. The annual Desert Mob opened last night with this vivid image evoked by Rene Kulitja and translated by Linda Rive. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

UPDATED 6.38pm, 11 September 2018: More text, more images. 

Desert Mob: the real deal

p2272-Desert-Mob-gallery-3p2362-des-mob-dancers

 

 

“Extraordinary contemporary art by some of Central Australia’s most celebrated Aboriginal artists” in a “truly unique event”  – this is almost upon us with the annual Desert Mob, no need to wait for Parrtjima. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

Desert imprints: artists' new ventures

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Desert artists are using a range of print-making techniques to reinterpret, more than simply reproduce, original art works. The results are showing in two new exhibitions, one in Alice Springs, the other in Sydney, writes KIERAN FINNANE.

 

The social value of art in desert communities

Desert Mob, now in its 23rd consecutive year, is Central Australia’s leading art exhibition claiming national and even international attention. But if you were been looking for an exploration of the work on its walls, of formal practice and aesthetic choices, then the Desert Mob Symposium (last September 6), was not the place to find it. Titled Faces, Places, Spaces it was not immediately concerned with the exhibition, but with art production as a socially valuable activity. ANNA GEORGIA MACKAY reflects upon the day. Pictured: Ngamaru Bidu, Nola Taylor, Muuki Taylor and Gabrielle Sullivan during the Martumili Artists presentation.

Never ending story: Desert Mob 2013

 

 

 

 

 

From Aboriginal art centres across the deserts comes one of the most significant interfaces between Central Australia and the rest of the world. KIERAN FINNANE reports from Desert Mob, the exhibition and the symposium.

 

Pictured: Warmurrungu by Nyarapayi Giles, Tjarlirli Arts.

Desert Mob sales down but still 10 days to go

The much talked about decline in the art market seems to be reflected in sales from Desert Mob, the flagship annual exhibition from Aboriginal art centres across the central deserts, presented by the Araluen Arts Centre and Desart. Opening weekend sales were down by more than $125,000 from last year – $206,435 compared with $332,175. However the gap has closed somewhat with sales continuing steadily.

Creative drive in the desert goes deep

SLIDESHOW
    From the on-going brilliance of artists from The Lands,
in the far north of South Australia, to the delightful evolution of the
soft sculpture coming out of Larapinta Valley town camp in Alice Springs
and the many shades of achievement in between, Desert Mob shows once
again that the drive to creativity amongst Aborigines of the desert is
unabated.

The exhibition, in its 21st year, keeps with its firmly established
tradition of huge diversity: dazzling paintings of the highest order,
drawing on ancient sacred traditions and knowledge, alongside naive
works that charm with their view of contemporary Aboriginal life; fine
art alongside crafts; refined crafts alongside those more simply, even
crudely yet expressively fashioned. KIERAN FINNANE reviews.

 

Opening night (above): the soft sculptures of
the Larapinta Valley town camp artists were much admired. In the
background are the dazzling paintings from Tjala Arts, based at Amata in
the APY Lands.

Slideshow: Wanampi Tjukurpa by Tiger Palpatja •
Wati Wilu-Ku Inma Tjukurpa by Dickie Minyintiri • Soft sculptures by
Yarrenyty Arltere artists • Hermannsburg Potters celebrate country music
• Bush Pig by a Greenbush artist • Ngaanyatjarra Council's 30th
Birthday Party by Jean Yinalanka Burke • Malilanya, ceramic by Renita
Stanley • Walu by Carol Maanyatja Golding • Images courtesy Araluen, the
artists and the art centres.

Creative drive in the desert goes deep

 

From the on-going brilliance of artists from The Lands, in the far
north of South Australia, to the delightful evolution of the soft
sculpture coming out of Larapinta Valley town camp in Alice Springs and
the many shades of achievement in between, Desert Mob shows once again
that the drive to creativity amongst Aborigines of the desert is
unabated. KIERAN FINNANE reports. Photo: Opening
night: the soft sculptures of the Larapinta Valley town camp
artists were much admired. In the background are the dazzling paintings
from Tjala Arts, based at Amata in the APY Lands.

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