Monday, May 10, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Tags Couch grass

Tag: couch grass

Buffel busting turnaround in parks? Not really.

p2406 Simpsons Gap grass kill SM

 

 

After driving through the sea of buffel grass that is most of Alice Springs at present, my heart lifted at the sight of swathes of dead buffel and couch at Simpsons Gap, writes KIERAN FINNANE.

Caterpillars as big as a mountain are starving

p2402 Walsh caterpllars SMp2402 Walsh Veronica Doobson & Fiona SM copy

 

Alice Springs has been described as caterpillar country but where are the caterpillars now? asks Dr FIONA WALSH in this contribution to our Rest & Reflection series.

 

UPDATE, 20 January 2017, 'Lost' 4th totemic caterpillar sighted.

Restoring the wild river: citizen action can make a difference

Citizen action is part of the answer to management of the Todd River.

The current state of the river corridor is "our problem, the community's problem", says Ken Johnson, who has lived close to the river for 15 years. Over the last two years he has adopted the section of east bank between the Wills Terrace causeway and the Stott Terrace bridge and made it his business to control particularly buffel grass but also the couch along that stretch. The work has paved the way for the return of a wide variety of native grasses and shrubs such as plum bush and the birdlife that comes with them.

When he started, buffel grass was growing waist-high through this area and so thickly that it had pushed almost everything else either out of sight or out altogether. At the right time – in a vigorous growing phase – he sprayed both it and the couch, being careful not to spray anything else. He achieved a good kill rate of the invasive grasses and since then it has been a matter of following up to check for new seedlings, which he usually disposes of with his shovel. KIERAN FINNANE reports. 

Pictured: Ken Johnson on the east bank of the Todd, amongst the native plum bush that has returned since he cleared the area of buffel grass. The Stott Terrace bridge is in the background.

Are fire vandals the only ones to blame for the state of the river?

 

 

People are arrested for deliberately throwing matches and setting fire to the landscape but who bears responsibility for allowing fire-promoting conditions to become entrenched? The Todd River corridor is a conservation zone and the Alice Springs Town Council has responsibility for its management. The Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority has given council a certificate permitting it to carry out "fire abatement management works".

To the casual observer it would appear that precious little has been done in this regard and many a mature tree in the river has borne the brunt of our neglect. With last summer's heavy rains, couch and buffel grass increased their stranglehold on the river and as they hayed off they provided the perfect conditions for fire vandals, mostly unchecked right up to the base of the trees.

The Alice Springs News Online asked council if it had undertaken, prior to the warmer weather, fuel reduction in the river corridors, including the Charles. We also asked whether council is going to undertake future fuel reduction as the burnt out areas in the river corridors regenerate and hay off.

Director of Technical Services, Greg Buxton, replied: "Earlier in the year Council made a decision to implement a mowing blitz across the municipality in response to large amounts of growth brought on by unprecedented rain events during 2010/2011. This proactive initiative was successfully implemented and coupled with Council's ongoing weed and growth program, which does include the Charles and Todd River beds, control of growth has been a priority for our teams. Alice Springs Town Council is working diligently to control growth and will continue to work proactively on this matter."

Our photographs show otherwise. Taken by vigilant naturalist Alex Nelson they clearly illustrate the priorities of council, which are to create parkland-type areas along some sections of the river banks, and to control growth along the walking and cycle path. Protecting the mature river gums – some of them hundreds of years old – clearly has low to nil priority. Pictured: Top – As we prepared our report  the Town Council was at work in the river, seeming to do its best to preserve couch and buffel grass around the base of a mature tree. Above right – Keeping the edges of the walking and cycle path mown takes priority over the protection of trees. As the long grasses hay off the stand in the distance, surrounded by a  sea of thick grass, will be in danger.  Photos by ALEX NELSON.
KIERAN FINNANE reports.

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