Sunday, May 16, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Tags Camps

Tag: camps

Finke: The race in which the town is always the winner

[youtube]http://youtu.be/btayoTtuVrA[/youtube]

The Finke, that grand fest of competitiveness, local can-do, fun and mateship is over again for a year, a boost not only to the town's self-esteem – at times short in supply – but also its coffers.

VIDEO: Hayden Bentley from South Australia limped home with a sick engine but still became the outright winner of the cars and buggy section of the 2013 Tatts Finke Desert Race.
The solo driver's time over the 226 km day two section was 01:52:49, a minute and 10 seconds ahead of Victorians Shannon and Ian Rentsch.
Mark Burrows and Colin Hodge, from NSW, were in third place in 01:56:27.
The first locals across the line were Andrew Moles and Matthew Ryan, in 9th place, coming second in the Prolite class in 02:00:48.
ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

LETTER: Labor’s $150m Alice town camps disaster

 

 

Sir - Minister Jenny Macklin has not only wasted $150m meant to improve living standards in the Alice Springs town camps she has badly let down the camp’s indigenous residents, writes Senator Nigel Scullion (pictured), Shadow Indigenous Affairs Minister.

LETTER: 110 days of peace in Yuendumu

Yes, we crossed 110 days of peace, writes Madhu Panthee, on behalf of the Yuendumu Mediation and Justice Committee and its chairman, Robert Jampijinpa Robertson.

Those in a hurry and those who are not

OPINION by ERWIN CHLANDA

 

I'm going to borrow for this opinion piece from the comments – around 100 – which our readers posted on occasion of the town council election.
The Alice Springs News Online is proud to host an increasingly lively forum for readers' views, many of them also contributing a wealth of relevant facts. The forum provides an interesting window onto the community  for the nine elected members of the 12th Alice Springs Town Council.
Among our most responded-to stories relating to the election was the interview with Port Augusta Mayor Joy Baluch, explaining her success in fixing problems in her town to which Alice Springs still doesn't have an answer.
Douglas Pearce wrote: "Please, please, please can we have her?"
The report prompted retired Alderman Jane Clark to comment that she didn't agree with Ms Baluch's public drinking ban, and saying: "I also wonder which of her initiatives has not been implemented here?"
And that leaves only this question: If they have all been implemented here as well, how come they work in Port Augusta but not here?

That was only just one of the disagreements of spirited election campaign ...

PHOTOS: Port Augusta Mayor Joy Baluch (above left) was a shining example – for some – of how to tackle problems. But she and retiring alderman Jane Clark (above right) were not on the same page.

2022 AD – What we could hope for in Indigenous affairs, apart from the odd miracle

 

 

Bob Durnan (pictured) is a community development worker with over three decades of experience in working with Aboriginal people in town camps and remote communities in the Northern Territory and Queensland. He looks forward to where we would hope to be when the sun sets on the current 10-year second phase of the Federal Intervention into Indigenous affairs in the Territory.

 

 

 

Those of us – of all ethnic backgrounds – who seriously look forward to still residing in the Northern Territory 10 years from now need to start getting our acts together if we want a tolerable social and climatic environment to enjoy in our dotage.
Apart from the grim fact that we must hope Australia doesn’t get dragged down into a world-wide economic quagmire – the new depression – and endure the suffering that would accompany the further disappearance of finance and trade, jobs and commerce, we have to still deal with our own unfolding local social catastrophe.
To help us do this dealing, we also must hope our nation’s strong streak of mean-mindedness and lack of empathy is diminished, at least a bit, as we badly need to continue receiving generous helpings of the GST gravy if we are to have any chance of achieving a safe, well-educated, healthy, productive and integrated society in the NT.
Equally we must hope that measures to abate global warming are implemented rapidly, despite their impacts on trade and finance. It’s hot enough in Central Australia as it already is.
If Australia’s national wellbeing survives these and other possible threats (the usual – war, terrorism, and their pressures for increased population shifts) then we could reasonably expect our national government to build on its already large investment in the Northern Territory Emergency Response, and see some Stronger Futures evolve in the NT; but as you may sense, I think it’s a bit of a long shot.

The facts the Amnesty fact finder didn't find

Rosalie Kunoth-Monks told Q&A's national audience on Monday: "We live in absolute poverty."
Do they? At the very least the residents of Utopia have income support in the form of Centrelink benefits.
Does "we" include her and her family?
They have a three bedroom house with airconditioning, according to someone familiar with Utopia, 250 km north-east of Alice Springs.
That person spoke with us after watching Q&A and on the condition of not being named.
Others might be sleeping rough, but sometimes it’s a choice: it's great for accessing the shop, a factor of transport rather than accommodation.
Sometimes camping rough is a necessity due to sorry business. No number of permanent housing will alleviate cultural expectations.  Some
people have access to housing on nearby outstations.
A local artist living on a truck was one of the exhibits when Salil Shetty, Secretary-General of Amnesty International, called in on his
one-day fact-finding mission.
But the artist's house on his nearby homeland was a fact not found by Mr Shetty because he wasn't made aware if it, our source suggests.
If he had, perhaps his finding would not have been that "around 500 homeland communities are being left to wither as the Government starves them of essential services". ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

Photo: Naronda William Loy, 21, with her daughter Karlishia Raggatt, 1, speak with Amnesty International's Secretary General Salil Shetty, at Mosquito Bore, Utopia, 8 October 2011. Courtesy Amnesty International.

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