Wednesday, August 5, 2020

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Tags Control

Tag: control

Interstate COVID hotspots: Will the bad guys get caught?

 

 

Don't hold your breath for an answer from the NT Government. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

'Big Council' needed in times of trouble


 
Local government needs to be recognised in the Constitution, which would allow council "more opportunities for engaging directly with Federal Government, to make sure the needs of our community are heard in Canberra," says Cr Jimmy Cocking (pictured, white shirt) in an interview with ERWIN CHLANDA  in his Big Council or Small Council series.

A pollie for constituents or the Hotels Association?

Is it even worse in the NT? Tough questions from a police association, preloading, maggoting, king hits: The growing preoccupation of a nation with its booze mayhem. PHOTO: Police resources tied up keeping an eye on bottle shops and their customers.

Sweetness and light in council meeting as factions keep truce

Sweetness and light continued to prevail in Monday's meeting of the town council committees, with not a hint of belligerent factionalism.

The jolly consensus allowed councillors to breeze through a big agenda probably in record time – at least so far as the meeting open to the public was concerned. Even wild man Eli Melky didn't pick a single fight, instead – "wearing his Rotary hat" – effusively thanked the council for supporting the hugely successful Bangtail Muster parade, and the council technical staff for their efforts, well beyond their call of duty, to keep the re-opened pool running.

The councillors asked for more than is contained in a report about Port Augusta's successful fight against anti social behaviour.

PHOTOS: Top - The town council got a gong for its assistance to the Bangtail Muster parade. Middle - the photo councillors have in

their wallets these days: Tough Port Augusta Mayor Joy Baluch. The Alice town council is taking a hard look at her grog and crime control measures. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

How did private company get native title land for real estate development?

 

By ERWIN CHLANDA

A native title holder says there should be an investigation into the ownership of the land in Mt Johns Valley now being developed as a residential estate.
William Craig says he and his sister Connie, both from the Antulye estate group, have been fighting for four years to get clarity about the deal.
The process by which the land came into the possession of LAE Nominees Pty Ltd needs to be investigated, he says. The town's native title body Lhere Artepe Aboriginal Corporation (LAAC) had authority over the land and was the party to do a deal in its regard with the NT Government. The question is, how did the land end up in the hands of a private company over which LAAC has no control. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

DRAWING: Architect's impression of units at Mt Johns subdivision.

Revealing the spirit of Parsons Street

 

 

I was  commissioned  to provide creative direction for the eastern end of Parsons Street from the ‘ancient red gum’ to the Todd River. Public art and design projects of the scale envisaged provide a rare, perhaps once in a generation opportunity to define our sense of identity and place.

The dramatic natural environment is regarded as the common ground that binds us all together and this is crystallised in the biodiversity corridor proposed for Parsons Street.  I've also highlighted the critical importance of distant landmarks and the availability of winter
sun. Too often these public assets  are only valued and recognised, when they are lost to the streetscape: casualties of 'progress'. MIKE GILLAM writes.

Pictured: Top – Right – Magpie Lark. These birds are frequent visitors at outdoor cafes around town. Photographs copyright MIKE GILLAM.

Treat firebugs as major criminals – call by chief bushfire fighter

Map above: fires today. Note color code bottom right of country already burned this year.

 

Police should treat firebugs as major criminals, says Matt Braitling,
of Mt Doreen Station, the chairman of Bushfire NT, southern region.

He says except for the blaze at Numery Station, set off by lightning,
all the massive number of bushfires in Central Australia in the past
weeks were deliberately lit.

Meanwhile South Australia is sending fire fighters, and MLA for
Braitling Adam Giles lashes out at the lack of preparedness for the what
was long known would be a catastrophic fire season.

"It's usually easy to pinpoint where fires start," says Mr Braitling.

"Police need to set up crime scenes at these locations."

They should deploy forensic teams, check for things like tyre marks
and discarded rubbish, fingerprint items, use trackers and seek the
assistance of people who have local knowledge.

"It's attempted murder," says Mr Braitling. "People will die." ERWIN CHLANDA reports. 

Posted Oct 4, 2011: Interesting story on
the ABC about concerns in South Australia about buffel grass invading
from the NT. The introduced grass species is a major contributor to the
seriousness of the current bushfires. Today rain is providing relief.
Search the Alice Springs News Online archive for articles about buffel grass.

Remote control not new

 

Voice recorders and a desk from which Flight Service officers
at the Alice Springs airport assisted pilots flying in the vast and
sparsely populated Central Australian outback. The facility, once
employing two dozen highly skilled people, was shut down in 1992. The
equipment shown is now in the aviation museum which is part of the
Araluen complex.

 

"There has definitely been no diminishing of services out of the Alice Springs tower."

So said Airservices Australia manager of corporate communications Rob
Walker, responding to concerns that a remote system, to be tried out
next year, may replace with cameras the human beings in the traffic
control tower at the airport.

In fact, there has been quite a lot of diminishing.

Until the early 1990s the tower was staffed 24/7, was in charge of
all air traffic over Central Australia, international jets and all, and
had about a dozen highly qualified controllers living here in Alice
Springs.

Today the tower is staffed 8am to 6pm Sunday to Friday, and 8am to
7pm Saturdays, looks after only low-level traffic in the close vicinity
of Alice Springs, and has a total staff of four. Brisbane and
Melboure now look after the rest.

The flight information service, Flight Service as we used to call it, has been shut down altogether. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

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