Wednesday, June 16, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Home Issue 38

Issue 38

Alleged burglars sought by police

 

 

Police are asking for public assistance to identify two males who are responsible for several offences including the unlawful entry of an Alice Springs bar.

LETTER: Quota back in Alice

Quota International is looking to re-establish the once vibrant Quota Club in Alice Springs.

Aboriginal job training scheme in the bush: Governments, bureaucrats, contractors, public money – who gains what? A case study.

We are returning this story to the home page because we have received further government responses – as distinct from answers.

Leaving your home town to learn a trade is a tough call for anyone, even more so if you're an Aborigine living in a tight-knit remote community: while the bright lights may be alluring, the temptation of booze too often has catastrophic consequences.

Now a Cairns, Darwin and Adelaide based company has developed what may well be the answer: Don't take the people to the training, take the training to the people. By ERWIN CHLANDA. Photo: Construction industry trainees in the APY lands.

Coniston: survivors & descendants recall massacre in new film

How could a man designated Protector of Aborigines end up leading a revenge party that would shoot at least 31 of them, including women and children, and probably many more, in retaliation for the death of one white man? It is a question that preoccupies a white Australian audience but the film Coniston does not try to answer it.  Nor does it look in much detail into the broad context of the infamous event it is concerned with – the last white on black massacre in Australia, starting at Coniston, about 250 kms north-west of Alice Springs, in 1928. The one hour documentary, that includes dramatised sequences, focusses instead on capturing the oral history of the massacre held by Warlpiri, Anmatyerr and Kaytetye people. KIERAN FINNANE reviews.

 

Country Liberals 'not ruling out' a floor price for alcohol

Key stakeholders in the Centre will meet about alcohol policy

 

UPDATE, September 18, 7.00pm: While they are "not ruling out" the introduction of a floor price on alcohol, the Country Liberals have "traditionally opposed it", said a spokesperson for Deputy Chief Minister Robyn Lambley ... read more in FULL STORY. 

 

Deputy Chief Minister Robyn Lambley would appear to be foreshadowing the introduction of a floor price for alcohol – whether Territory-wide or in Central Australia only is not clear. She has just issued a press release, calling on Police Minister Kon Vatskalis to say "whether Labor supports a floor price on the sale of take-away alcohol – a supply side measure Labor previously opposed when in Government". – Kieran Finnane

Bushfires an even bigger heartache when they are started by fools

The big country we live in turns into a monster when it burns, thumbing its nose at our feeble efforts to regain the upper hand.
It's the more agonising when the cause is human stupidity, carelessness or malice, as appears to have been the case a few days ago when part of the West MacDonnell National park, our greatest tourism asset, was turned into cinder.
An area of about 40 square kilometers was burned.
One blaze was started by the roadside near Redbank Gorge.
Another, ignited in dozens of spots for some 30 kilometers on the Glen Helen to Alice Springs road, was lit by sparks from a car driven on its rims. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

ABOVE: The Finke River (foreground) stopped the bushfire just short of a popular bush camp, and the Glen Helen Resort. Mount Sonder is in the background, charred bushland in the middle ground. LEFT: A curry wattle re-grows after a bushfire in the MacDonnell Ranges, near Ormiston.

Briscoe Inquest: reduce supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets, says Coroner

"The NT Police shoulders a huge burden from alcohol sales. They cannot be expected to tackle the social problems that result, in the absence of further initiatives to stop the flow of alcohol in the community." – Coroner Greg Cavanagh, Kwementyaye Briscoe Inquest.

 

Less than one month after taking power and ushering in a new era of Territorians taking "individual responsibility" for their drinking, the Mills CLP Government has been called upon by the Coroner to urgently convene a stakeholder meeting in Alice Springs to commit to "all available, reasonable measures to reduce the supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets". This is one of two recommendations to the government arising from the inquest into the death in custody of Kwementyaye Briscoe, who died in the Alice Springs Watch House on January 4 this year. Coroner Greg Cavanagh handed down his findings today. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

- Advertisment -

Most Read

Man dies after Finke history is made by Toby Price

UPDATE 2.55pm A spectator is dead and two people are injured after an accident this morning during the car section of the race, prompting the...

The fastest Finke ever

By OSCAR PERRI It was a record breaking first day of the Tatts Finke Desert Race, with Toby Price the fastest ever time to Finke...

Brian Butler, mentor to the Stolen Generations

1947 - St Francis' House Boys - Back: Charlie Kunoth, Bill Espie, Peter Tilmouth, John Palmer - Middle: Laurie Bray, Charlie Perkins, Ernie Perkins,...

Toby Price in a truck fastest in Finke prologue

By OSCAR PERRI Racing at Finke began in earnest today as competitors faced off in the prologue, competing to be first off the line in...