Wednesday, June 16, 2021

The freedom of the press still furnishes that check upon government which no constitution has ever been able to provide – Chicago Tribune.

Home Issue 33

Issue 33

From Papunya to Paris: the interest in Western Desert art just keeps going

Papunya Tula artists at the National Gallery of Victoria last year with curator Judith Ryan. From left, they are Bobby West Tjupurrula, Long Jack Phillipus Tjakamarra, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa and Mike Tjakamarra. They are standing in front of a 1991 work by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, Wartunuma.

A major exhibition on the origins of Western Desert art is set to open at the Musee du Quai Branly in Paris in October. Curated by Judith Ryan and Philipp Batty for the National Gallery of Victoria, Tjukurrtjanu opened in Melbourne last year, examining "a watershed moment in the history of art when a painting practice emerged at Papunya". More than 160 of the first paintings produced there during 1971 and 1972 will be shown in Paris, together with almost 100 objects and photographs from the period.

The Paris exhibition is just one of the events occurring in the second half of this year that gives Papunya Tula Artists – the desert's oldest painting company and still the benchmark of independence and achievement – reason to be optimistic. KIERAN FINNANE reports. 

Alice youngsters ponder becoming high fliers

If anyone in the audience had ambitions to become a corporate high flier they may well have changed their minds.

Bernard Salt, who addressed about 80 young people on the subject at St Philip's College on Tuesday, sometimes gets up a 3am to write his column for the Australian newspaper, goes to work when his staff clocks on at 9am, puts in a 9 hour day and never parts from his iPhone, 24/7 and 365 days, in case a journalist wants to get a quote from him at 2am about the stock market heading north or south. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.
PHOTO: Mr Salt speaking with Year 12 student, Rachel McCulloch. He was brought to Alice Springs by the Central Australian Education Foundation.

Spend big on a youth centre, says councillor

UPDATE Aug 21: Comprehensive comment below by Councillor Steve Brown.

 

A massive complex welcoming young people of all races, those on the edge of the law and those who are not, in the centre of the town, possibly the defunct Memo Club or on the still vacant Melanka site, is a proposal Councillor Steve Brown will be putting before the town council.

"We need to reduce the us and them thing," he says.
The project would cost $30m to $40m and require funding from the Federal and NT Governments.

Image: Regional youth centres are common in Australia, such as the Coomera / Oxenford Youth Centre on the Gold Coast. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

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